Rich Lingor "Wets A Line" For The November Fish Report

Rich Lingor "Wets A Line" For The November Fish Report

When imagination paints a picture of November, the approaching chill of winter would likely fill the canvas. -Rich Lingor-

Rich Lingor with a solid bass (Photo credit: Tim Taylor)

Rich Lingor with a solid bass (Photo credit: Tim Taylor)

Our local lakes are showing signs of responding to the newly available nurseries provided by the flooded brush and weeds. Young fish are surviving with the abundant protection provided by the vast amounts of cover that thrived during the drought. Plentiful nutrients resulting from dissolving vegetation are contributing to the building blocks of the food chain. Our local lake are primed for a bright future.

 October fishing for spotted bass at Nacimiento has been good to terrific. Some days have required more persistence and searching to be rewarded by making connection with the objects of attention. Fish have been scattered from deep to shallow and relating to both structure and featureless portions of the lake. There seems to be plenty of fish and enough seemed willing to bite on each trip to put a few bends in a fishing rod. Some days the winning combination has been faster moving reaction bait lures, and some days only the slower finesse presentations get attention. 

When imagination paints a picture of November, the approaching chill of winter would likely fill the canvas.  Brilliant romantic colors of fall fading to the grey skies of winter's grasp inspire plenty of dreams and activities, but thoughts of fishing and a day on the water fade with visions of receding warm sunshine.

 Predicting either weather or fishing success in November from the traditional Thanksgiving scene on a colorful calendar may risk missing some delightful and rewarding sets of circumstances.

 While November's overall weather trend can be discouraging, warm sunshine or cold weather systems don't march to an exact schedule. The calendar reminds us that harsh cold fronts are on the way. Let's peek at the bright side of cold or cooler weather of fall fishing. Our local reservoirs are home to warm water fish species. Warm water fish are most active when the water is not too cold or too hot.  Summertime water temperatures can get high enough to reduce fish activity. Start of Fall's cooler days and colder nights can cool water temperatures to comfortable levels for fish that have been stressed by disagreeable heat. A popular theory of fall fishing says, "when the fish sense that winter is coming, they feed heavily to build up enough reserve fat to survive the winter." I think they feed with more enthusiasm because they just feel better. This angler is invigorated by days of not too hot and not too cold. Anticipating stimulated fish activity cultivates motivation to be there to meet them. There is still time to get a tug on your fishing string.

                                                                      Tight Lines,

                                                                                        Rich

 

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