The Speed-Shot from the Back Deck

The Speed-Shot from the Back Deck

The drop-shot, contrary to popular belief, doesn’t have to be fished slow.

When you mention the drop-shot, most bass anglers will envision a painstakingly slow, time-consuming presentation. Yes, often that’s the case for typical drop-shot angling. However, when the front deck angler is quickly covering water fishing power style techniques, the drop-shot can successfully match that pace from the back deck.

The Speed-Shot applies to back deck anglers in multiple situations; non-shared weight co-anglers, shared weight Pro/Ams, and team events too. When fishing behind another angler, the Drop-shot is a proven high percentage bass catching technique. From the Elites to weekend warriors the drop-shot has also proven countless times, to be a winning pattern that produces big bass too.

The author with a hefty Casitas Lake Largemouth Bass caught with a drop-shot set-up.

The author with a hefty Casitas Lake Largemouth Bass caught with a drop-shot set-up.

Don’t be a Drag

If you fished the drop-shot enough you know, depending on the structure and cover elements, that dragging behind the boat can be a quick prescription for hanging up. You don’t want to needlessly break-off and re-tie; you don’t want the Pro to turn the boat around and go back for a drop-shot rig either.

Dragging and snagging is not a good way to make friends with the Pro. By fishing forward, you’ll avoid more hang-ups. Avoiding snags translates to more casts. It also means the fish will have more opportunity to take your offering.

When the front deck angler is moving fast, and fishing power techniques never think this situation eliminates the drop-shot as an option. The drop-shot can be presented quickly and effectively without ever dragging behind the boat.

Pro and Co-Angler fishing a levy bank at the California Delta.

Pro and Co-Angler fishing a levy bank at the California Delta.

The Technique

When the pro angler is focused on shoreline targets cast your drop-shot far forward and to outside depths well away from the pro’s casts. Stay in tune with your bait as it descends through the water column. Always be prepared for a bite on the fall; it often occurs and is easily missed.

Once the offering touches bottom, briefly fish the drop-shot to your preference, either dead-stick or shaking, leaving it in place. If the pace of the front deck angler allows, you can move the lure searching for additional cover elements. Otherwise, if a bite hasn’t already occurred, reel up and repeat before the boat comes even with your bait.

In shared weight formats, it’s an excellent technique that can complement a pro’s fast style. In non-shared weight competition, the drop-shot is a proven Co-Angler tool.

When fishing the Speed-Shot you’re not working faster than usual, the only thing that is sped up is the amount of time you’re leaving the drop-shot in place, you’re just eliminating the wait. Cast your bait, feel for the bite, no bite, no protracted waiting, retrieve and repeat, that’s the Speed-Shot.

A chunky tournament quality keeper bass takes the Speed-Shot. Note the exclusive Ventana, the world’s only internal rattling drop-shot weight.

A chunky tournament quality keeper bass takes the Speed-Shot. Note the exclusive Ventana, the world’s only internal rattling drop-shot weight.

Never Too Many Options

Not every fish will be on the predominant pattern.

When the Pro is picking apart the bank, casting to the outside in deeper water may be the only 'clean' water available. You have no control over boat position often making opportunities from the back of the boat limited. Being creative from the back deck can add up to success, and the Speed-Shot is another option for back deck anglers.

Equipment

The Cali-Clip by Cal Coast, red clip attached behind the grip, allows the drop-shot weight to be saddled. This allows the hook to remain embedded in the soft plastic bait and prevents the weight from bouncing during travel.

The Cali-Clip by Cal Coast, red clip attached behind the grip, allows the drop-shot weight to be saddled. This allows the hook to remain embedded in the soft plastic bait and prevents the weight from bouncing during travel.

The author’s Speed-Shot/Drop-Shot set-up above; Daiwa Tatula Elite 7’-1” drop-shot rod, Daiwa LT 2500D-XH spinning reel spooled with Daiwa Hi-Vis 15 lb. J-Braid (thank you Team Bling), 6 to 10 pound fluorocarbon leader, a #2 fine wire to a 2/0 medium wire Gamakatsu ReBarb hook dressed with a few select plastics, and the Team Davies Ventana rattling drop-shot weight. 

An angler doesn’t need to wait for bank burning run and gun situations to fish their targets by Speed-Shotting. Speed-Shot anytime you like; when the boater has spot-locked the position, is drifting slow, at any pace.

The Speed-Shot works from the front deck too.

The products listed in this article are available at Tackle Warehouse https://www.tacklewarehouse.com/

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